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on the situation in sudan. after that, timothy diner takes place in a discussion on u.s.- india trade relations. then a conversation with the texas governor rick perry. >> this fourth of july weekend on american history tv on c-span 3 will visit the smithsonian to learn about day expedition to circumnavigate the globe and the treasure that they found, 40 specimens which became the foundation for the smithsonian. laura bush on her time in the white house planning her part -- husband's library. and her memoir. then a panel including mike mccurry discussing jfk's relationship with the press. it the complete schedule as c- span.org. >> he says he is optimistic that sudan is on track to become an independent state in july 9. the obama ministration warned sudan that it continue to block humanitarian aid from landing, it could risk relations with the u.s. this briefing is just under 20 minutes. we touched upon various issues which focused on the economic and financial partnership opportunities between our two countries. while many industrial speakers, government speakers, regulators, institutions air
and 1971 wars against india allied pakistan with the united states in, what i believe, was the misnamed war on terror. certainly it was a war against al qaeda and president musharraf was our ally. he allowed u.s. troops access to pakistan military bases and airports as well as other support. it was, and remains, a turbulent time. the good news was the serious effort in educational reform and these things that are now stalled because of a more recent development. the embarrassing news was the discovery in 2005 that the father of pakistan's nuclear bomb sold technology to north korea and elsewhere. then there were the protests by the legal community about the below the -- validity of the 2007 election and the horrifying assassination of bhutto. events since have been more challenging. the takedown of osama bin laden, something that we all applaud, has exposed deep conflicts. the government recently ordered 200 special forces trainers to leave the country which resulted in a suspension by the obama white house of $800 million in u.s. military aid. yesterday, congress has taken a more severe po
, india faced a deficit and had failed to pass a balanced budget in several years. they cut taxes and pay down their debt. thanks for governor's leadership, our state is now the most attractive place to do business in the midwest. the spend less, borrow less, and tax less model of the and it is resulting in job creation and aaa credit rating and contracts to spend more, borrow more, and tax more from the president has resulted in less jobs, higher debt, and threaten to bring down credit rating agencies. the indiana model is the first to repairing the country's finances. this week, every senate republican took that step by committing to a balanced budget amendment and the u.s. constitution. the speaker of the house is committed to bringing it to a vote later this month. the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell has committed to fighting for a vote in the senate as well. growth or balance, that is the choice before us. some doubt our ability to overcome this fiscal crisis. but the problem we face is not insurmountable. we have overcome major challenges in the past. times of trial have al
month what india takes in every year and still, it only grows two percentage points faster than india. in other words, if you think about the quality of chinese growth, it's not as impressive as it appears. it is massive investment, a huge number of airports, eight- lane highways, a high-speed rail that's being built and if you look at what you are getting out of it in terms of the return on investment it is not as impressive. the un just came out with a report indicating that china is going to have a demographic collapse over the next 25 years. it is going to lose 400 million people. there is no point in human history in which you have had a dominant power in the world that is also declining demographically. it simply doesn't happen. and if you want to look at what a country in demographic decline looks like, look at japan and ask yourself how powerful it is. even if china were the largest economy in the world, those numbers are all based on something called purchasing power parody, where china's gdp gets inflated because the cost of a haircut in beijing is less than the cost of one
to say a few words about today's bombings in mumbai, india. we condemn these disparate -- despicable acts of violence designed to provoke fear. those who perpetrated them must know they cannot succeed. the indian people have suffered from acts of terrorism before, and we have seen them respond with courage and resilience. we are continuing to monitor the situation including the safety and security of american citizens. at our hearts are with the victims and their families. we have reached out to the indian government to express our condolences and offer support. i will be traveling to india next week as planned. i believe it is more important than ever that we stand with india, dig deep, and reaffirm our commitment to the shared struggle against terrorism. neither of our countries, the russian federation or the united states, are unfortunately strangers to terrorism. it has been a mutual goal of both of our presidents to increase our cooperation in order to prevent terrorists from wreaking their violence on innocent russians, americans, and others come and to bring those who do so to just
require europeans to be supportive and brazil and china and india to also no longer pretend like they are sub-saharan africa. i believe that the africans can help us do that. i was against the view of dumbing doha down. i wanted to and i get a deal on an enemy, so i was making a case for being more bold and aggressive. in the u.s. constitutional system, everything has to go back to congress, but i honestly think that if you are not doing it, the congress is not going to do it for you. it is not going to come -- you will not get a trade deal driven by congress. you need someone in the united states to organize this with a condition and a vision. you also have to help people adjust to change. the other place where the united states has not kept up is that we have an unemployment insurance system that is 80 years old. we have a trade adjustment assistance program that is 50 years old. you have a workforce investment act that is 30 years old. why not take these tens of billions of dollars and ask yourself, is this the system we would design to get people back into jobs in an economy
foreign investment every month were india takes it in over -- every year and they only grow 2% faster than india. it is not as impressive as it appears. massive investment, a huge number of airports, highways, high-speed rail. if you look at what you are getting out of it in terms of the return of investment, not as investment. china has a huge problem that they face. the u.n. can out with a report that pointed out that china will have a demographic collapse of the next 25 years. they will lose 400 million people. there is no point in human history in which you have had a dominant power in the world that is also declining demographically. it simply does not happen. if you want to look at what a country in demographic decline looks like, look at japan. how powerful is it? politically, even if china is the largest economy in the world, and those numbers are all based on purchasing power parity where there gdp gets inflated because the cost of a hair cut is less than one in toronto, but your international power does not depend on the price of hair cuts but foreign aid, oil, and international
this in india. i worked with the president in india. farmers are using cell phones to text message their sprinklers to turn on and off. and they are becoming a heck of a lot more productive. if they can do it to be more productive and the sectors of the economy that you do not think as facebook users. they are harnessing the power of technology to improve their lives for their own work. i can't crack this code to get mainstream jobs harnessing this. restaurants are finding ways to optimize that extra seat, by harnessing the daily deal, the real file information -- real time information sharing. they are starting to see this in main street but we need to do more. >> i want to read-focus on the question asked. it's one of the key things we have tried to explore, which is how can we share the benefits of growth extensively? how can we have extensive g rowth? what we have is not just the stagnation of wages. we have a winner take all of society as the people that are able to compete on around the world in an information society have prospered in this country and others have not . i do
michele bachmann was on the night before and said that president obama's trip to india was going to cost $2 billion. what ever it was. and he had let it go. he did a wonderful thing, anderson cooper. he'd be constructed the whole -- deconstructed the whole story, showed how it began with an unnamed indian official. as if an unnamed indian official in maharajas and would have any idea what the president's trip was going to cost and involved 32 naval ships. this thing was crazy. so he did constructed the whole story. i thought it was so good, i got a transcript and i wrote a column on it, giving him a shout out for doing it. the next day i was giving a talk to the honor society. i get my bagel, my coffee, i sit down at the table lets 7:00 a.m. -- at 7:00 a.m. the first thing a young man said at the table is, did you know obama's trip was going to cost a billion dollars? and i said, did not see anderson cooper? i tell this whole story in the book. and michele bachmann just announced for the presidency. that is utterly irresponsible. >> let me talk about the role of new media. in that case,
muslim- majority nation with nuclear weapons. it has neighbors such as india and iran and china and afghanistan. s importance cannot be diminished. the good news is that we are working on our democracy. we have sustained it for three years. hopefully, we will be able to sustain it for a long-term future. we are in the process of normalizing relations with the two neighbors we have had trouble having relations with, afghanistan and india. the tough thing is that we are also thinking of looking at things differently, at instead of sitting at the crossroad of these complex, and we want to see ourselves with the opportunities that this presents. transition is not easy. it will be difficult. it will take time. but we have the clarity of our vision and the intent is there to do it. i will leave all the tough questions for karen to ask and for me to answer during the dialogue. thank you for being here. [applause] >> you can all see that ambassador haqqani is a very good speaker. [laughter] he is paired with john stuart on "the daily show," on oakwood charlie rose," " and he is very ade
property bubble. they take in this foreign investment every month when india takes in every year and still it only grows two percentage points faster than india. if you think about the quality of chinese growth it's not as impressive as it appears. massive investment. a huge number of airports, high speed rail. if you look at what you're getting out have -- of it in terms of return on investment, not as impressive. china has a huge problem. the u.n. came out with a report that pointed out that china is going to have a demographic clams over the next years. it is going to lose 400 million. there is no point in human history in which you've had a dominant power in the world that is also declining demographically. simply doesn't happen. if you want to see what a country in decline looks like look at japan and ask yourself how powerful is it? china's g.d.p. gets inflated because the cost of a haircut in beijing is less than one in toronto. but g.d.p. depends on foreign aid and oil and international investments and aircraft carriers and for all of that you need real hard currency and that adjus
assistance to countries like china and india to implement renewable energy programs. at a time when our nation is broke, and we are broke, why are we sending taxpayer money to our foreign competition? i urge support of this amendment. and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from indiana. mr. visclosky: i rise in opposition to the gentleman's amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. visclosky: i would point out to my colleagues that the amendment, as stated by the gentleman, would eliminate all funding for the office of energy efficiency and renewable energy. the bill already includes a reduction of $491 million from the current-year level, which is a 25% cut. the debate relative to energy policy in this house not necessarily restricted to this amendment, talks about subsidies. but there are two parts to a federal budget. there are spending side issues and revenue and tax-side issues. i would hazard to guess, there isn't an energy source in the united states of america, be it coal, nuclear, gas, solar, wind, do
whether you are in africa, china, india, or others. the bigger picture here is a combination of dealing with the substantive challenges that the u.s. and europe places, but also a sense about what role they will play in shaping this future international system that has some incredible opportunities. what does not have to look at doom and gloom in this. africa is going on average about 5% for a decade. there are lots of opportunities there. private capital is going there. china has gone 9.9% in 30 years. there are great opportunities, but there -- but they have to be seized. we got to figure out how developed and emerging markets work together in a different way than they did in the past. >> bob, another news item that is getting a lot of justified attention is the food crisis in eastern africa where 11 million people are at risk in the current drought. i know the world bank is taking immediate action in the crisis. what can be done to address the longer-term food problem in developing countries? >> well, again, there is the danger an opportunity with this. the opportunity is that if we
facilities in china and india become more efficient. that's great, but why are we helping them with money we borrow from them to make their industries more efficient. then we improve energy efficiency in the chinese building secor. let's strengthen our economic opponents with money we borrowed from them. in fact, the t.o.e. announced a $25 million project over the next five years to support the u.s.-india joint clean energy research and development center. why isn't it a u.s. research and development cent her why are we spending hard-earned, hard-borrowed daughters overseas? even more programs, one to promote energy efficiency in indian software companies. unbelievable. why promote -- why aren't we promoting nrnl efficiency in american companies? partnering with kazakhstan to increase their vehicle efficiency productive iity. i like the automobile business, why don't we work on it here. energy centers in peru and costa rica. windmills in mexico. we're building windmills in mexico. renewable energy strategy developed in the caribbean and windmills in the dominican republic. ladies and gentlem
's trip to india was going to cost $2 billion. and he had let it go. he did a wonderful thing, anderson cooper. he'd be constructed the whole story, showed how it began with an unnamed indian official. as if an unnamed indian official would have any idea what the president's trip was going to cost and involved 32 naval ships. this thing was crazy. so he did constructed the whole story. i thought it was so good, i got a transcript and i wrote a column on it, giving him a shout out for doing it. the next day i was giving a talk to the honor society. the first thing a young man said at the table is, did you know obama's trip was going to cost a billion dollars? and i said, did not see anderson cooper? i tell this whole story in the book. and michele bachmann just announced for the presidency. that is utterly irresponsible. >> let me talk about the role of new media. in that case, for example, you can argue that it was because of the internet that spread that story, but even before anderson cooper, there were self correcting mechanisms on the internet. do you think the internet is increasin
itself is basically a troublesome prospect, whether you are in africa or china or india or others. so the bigger picture is a combination of dealing with the substantive challenges that the u.s. and europe and japan face, but also a sense about what role they would play in shaping this future international system that does, as everybody here working on development knows, have some incredible opportunities. one does not have to look at gloom and doom in this. africa has grown an average of about 5% for a decade. there's lots of opportunities there. we have private capital growing. china has grown 9.9%. it depends how you look at the world, but there are great opportunities, but they have to be seized, and we have to figure out how developed and emerging markets were together in a different way than they did in the past. bob, another news item getting a lot of justified attention is the food crisis in eastern africa, where 11 million people are at some risk in the current drought. this is everything from research on seats, including different conditions of climate change and drought and
much. when you tax them too ch, they go other places and when they go other places like china, india, mexico, vietnam, they take our jobs with them. i've heard a lot about medicare. the only party in this house who has cut medicare is the democrat party. $500 billion out of medicare in an ipab bill that is going to ration care for our seniors. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair would remind members to heed the gavel. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van holn: mr. speaker, i would urge my colleagues to look at the congressional budget office analysis of the impact of the republican budget on senior citizens on medicare. essentially what they do is give seniors a raw deal compared to what members of congress get themselves. anda raw deal in a big way. -- a raw deal in a big way. with that i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: yield one minute to dr. fleming. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana. mr. fleming: thank you. mr. speaker, but for the president of the united states
are used to this in the united states, but in china and india, if we have not had this information. this information can lead to some of the panic and volatility situations. rather than try to control prices, which is not going to work, it makes sense to focus on those most vulnerable and most in need tariff one of the things we started to learn at the bank after the 1997 financial crisis in east asia and latin america is that the macro economics to about -- stability was not enough. if you could lose a generation that you do not have the appropriate food and nutrition. literally a generation, because it could affect the potential of children to reach potential. we have been working with developing countries at different stages of development on basic safety net programs. just to give you one, the people know pretty well, mexico started something, conditional programs. they go to the 15% most needy and on the condition that people send their children to school and people get health checkups, probably doing more for women's health that in mexico than anything else in the history of
in new world. it is obvious a lot of cheap products come from abroad whether it is china or india or other places with low-cost labor. the focus on the u.s., it is widely agreed it needs to be on producing skilled workers who need to be able to beat out from around the world. on the repatriation tax holiday issue, the u.s. companies that have expanded overseas now have a lot of money in their overseas accounts. they have made the case to have a tax holiday to bring it back to the u.s. and invest the in u.s. jobs. it is gaining some traction as an idea. one concern is that u.s. companies have quite a bit of cash on their balance sheets at home. they are not using got to go out and create new jobs as much as they could. part of it is they do not see the demand. consumers are not spending as much as they would need to support something like that. there's a lot of cash and use right now. host: what is the rate they are taxed at? guest: the highest tax rates are around 35%. there is discussion of bringing them closer to 25%. the problem is tax rates are spread out so broadly among diff
their duty. i do not see them going to china or india. they are still living here because it's still the best place in the world. host: funeral service will be held for former first lady betty ford today. look for our coverage on c- span.org. first lady michelle obama will be attending that funeral. this is in "the new york times" op-ed section today. democratic caller, you are the last on this topic. mini deal or grand bargain? caller: just like we have a new york state lotto, why don't we have a government lotto? i know i would buy a ticket. everybody would. the money would be going to social security. that would help out the country. the other thing we do -- our troops. that would also save trillions of dollars. thank you very much. host: coming up in about 45 minutes, we will talk to the chamber of commerce and get their perspective, the business perspective on these debt talks. coming up next, we will talk to congressman chaka fattah about the debt talks. we will be right back. >> senators will continue debating the debt and deficit in next week. keep up to date with c-span's congression
that we used to make care are now being made in china and india and are being imported. you also have technology. if you go into a modern auto factory, there are fewer people walking around than there was 30 years a. go in the long run, those are good things. it makes people more productive and wealthier and that sort of thing. in the near term, that can have the effect that the caller is talking about which is fewer jobs available and less work to go around especially for people who don't have the best educations and want to work with their hands. it is definitely a phenomenon that is going on. host: raleigh, north carolina, republican line. caller: i have a question and comment. do you think that na the relativeivete of president obama when he took office accounts for the fact that he overstated and misrepresented the effect of the stimulus bill? we know that he is learning on the job. i want to know if the stimulus bill in itself was adequate or was obama misrepresenting it? secondly, with the unemployed rate rising, is that not more of an example of the cyclical economic trends th
for. sending jobs to china and india. job say let's protect creators, but there are no jobs. they just keep selling us out and selling us out. host: there is of the work on twitter -- a couple of stories talking about the financial implications of what's going on right now in washington. and a similar story -- let's hear from virginia beach on our independent line, don. caller: good morning. i would like to speak on the last gentleman's comments. i don't understand why people just don't see a the whole system is broken. our political system is broken. all of these congressmen, democrats and republicans, have too many special interests. the lobbyists are the problem. host: you are echoing comments made by -- caller: they talk about our political system in this country as a sham. host: i think we lost him. let's go to a democratic caller in new hampshire, ron. our focus is the balanced budget amendment. is it necessary? caller: i don't believe it is. a matter what kind of numbers you put up there, if we need the money, we're going to print some more. to echo the last couple previous call
china, india, and brazil. when i say things that we may, i mean things that are made here in america. the american economy is slowly becoming more export-oriented and manufacturing oriented. you can see an upturn taking place in the manufacturing sector and the export sector. the problem is that in the last 10 to 20 years, as the economy became so dependent on american consumers, they got really cleaned out. the growth of that we are seeing in manufacturing, believe it or not, we have seen upturns. we have stories about carmakers in the midwest that are not big enough anymore to drive weaker overall economy. it used to be that we would have these big inventory cycles where they would cut back from the recession and then rebuild, driving the economy out of recession and into of recovery. so, this process we are going troops is long and painful. we are starting to see the seeds of it taking place. host: goods, manufacturing, can it be services as well? guest: think in the facts of foreigners coming here. that is an export in terms of individuals coming here to work, say in restaurants.
is with the reasons. when i was in some area in india where the malaria mosquito -- out of fear, there were questions. necessary. emotional system is such. more self-centered attitude here, more fear, more anxiety, more stress. >> they need you to project your voice. >> i think this should be sufficient. there are two levels of fear. one fear is with reasons. when a mad dog comes ready to bite, if you are still meditating compassion, it is rather foolish. [laughter] another kind of fear is protection. when you talk of fear, it is a bottled emotion. there are many other emotions. fehr -- fear -- selfish is part of our nature. without that, we would be like a robot. we cannot survive. therefore, we are selfish. wise selfish is much better than foolish selfish. it brings more fear. more suspicion. this unnecessary source of suspicion, it is based on the distressed, selfishness. -- this trust, selfishness. brotherhood, sisterhood. everybody wants happiness. i am one of them. the more the rest of the community is healthy, i get more happiness. there is no way to gain maximum benefit to oneself for getting
. india is adding 18 million cellphones a month. they are now part of this flat world. i have spent a lot of time following the middle east. we have connected detroit and damascus. now we have connected detroit, damascus, and dara. it is a dusty desert town on the syrian-jordanian border where the revolution began. syria has banned every international news organization. bbc, cnn, fox, "new york times," and al jazeera. yet every night, you have been seeing news footage coming out of dra. if you look at the bottom of your screen, it says is from smn. sham news network. sham is arabic for syria. i would bet the governors in their wallets right now have enough money in their wallets to start sham news network. they have been pumping out video and flip camera footage from dara through sham news network. that is half what the world has become. on october 30, 2010, an indian newspaper ran a small item. i happened to be there at a time. it caught my eye. it said a communications firm had just started had3g service at the summit of mount everest. it will allow thousands of climbers to access highs
connecting boston, bangalore, and another city. india is adding 18 million cellphones a month. they are now part of this flat world. i have spent a lot of time following the middle east. we have connected detroit and damascus. now we have connected detroit, damascus, and dara. it is a dusty desert town on the syrian-jordanian border where the revolution began. syria has banned every international news organization. bbc, cnn, fox, "new york times," and al jazeera. yet every night, you have been seeing news footage coming out of dra. if you look at the bottom of your screen, it says is from smn. sham news network. sham is arabic for syria. i would bet the governors in their wallets right now have enough money in their wallets to start sham news network. they have been pumping out video and flip camera footage from dara through sham news network. that is half what the world has become. on october 30, 2010, an indian newspaper ran a small item. i happened to be there at a time. it caught my eye. it said a communications firm had just started had3g service at the summit of mount everest. it will
in the range of 6.5, some of them such as india and china getting higher marks, so we are facing a turnaround which is very uneven with country's leading the charge and not those that were historic leading the charge and others advanced economies that are lagging behind in a way given the status of development. in the midst of that, we have clearly the two categories different issues to address but if ware to provide service and guidance, advice and recommendations and if and when necessary and if asked support. those are on the one hand the issues of sovereign debt and concerns all advanced economies ranging from japan to the united states, but clearly with a focus as you write about it as we know with a focus on the year autozone and in particular a country such as greece. on the other hand, when we look at emerging markets we have in some corners the risk of overheating, and we obviously have the risk of inflation as well, and sometimes particularly in the low-income countries the risk of imported completion that results from a high prices of commodities and including commodities obviously
, they go other places and when they go other places like china, india, mexico, vietnam, they take our jobs with them. i've heard a lot about medicare. the only party in this house who has cut medicare is the democrat party. $500 billion out of medicare in an ipab bill that is going to ration care for our seniors. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair would remind members to heed the gavel. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van hollen: mr. speaker, i would urge my colleagues to look at the congressional budget office analysis of the impact of the republican budget on senior citizens on medicare. essentially what they do is give seniors a raw deal compared to what members of congress get themselves. anda raw deal in a big way. -- a raw deal in a big way. with that i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio. mr. jordan: yield one minute to dr. fleming. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana. mr. fleming: thank you. mr. speaker, but for the president of the united states who serves today and a democrat-co
it is obvious that a lot of cheap products come from abroad, whether china or india or any number of other places that have low-cost labor. it is obvious a lot of cheap oducts come from abroad whether it is china orndia or other places with low-cost labor. the focus on the u.s., it is widely agreed it needs to be on producing skilled workers who need to be able to beat out from around the world. on the repatriation tax holiday issue, the u.s. companies that have expanded overseas now have a lot of money in their overseas accounts. they have made the case to have a tax holiday to bring it back to the u.s. and invest the in u.s. jobs. is gaining some traction as an idea. one concern is that u.s. companies have quite a bit of cash on their balance sheets at home. they are not using got to go out and create new jobs as much as they could. part of it is they do not see the demand. consumers are not spending as much as they would need to suort something like that. there's a lot of cash and use right now. host: what is theate they are taxed at? guest: the highest tax rates are around 35%. there i
are only spending 2% of our g.d.p. on our infrastructure. and while china and india are spending 10% of their g.d.p. reinvesting back into their country, and we will lose the future if we do not make these investments. these are critical to the competitiveness of the united states. these -- both the dams that need to be built and the high-speed rail. and the roads and the combined sewer and the airports and the ports and the highways and the bridges. we need to invest in all of these things. our country is crumbling. and we can't have members say we only need to make this one investment for this one dam because it's in my district and because i know families who have been hurt. we've got to elevate ourselves and look what needs to be done in the entirety of the whole country and how are we going to compete against china, how are we going to compete against india, how are we going to be globally competitive. all of these investments need to be made, including the economic development and the private investment that can be drawn in through high-speed rail. i yield back the balance of
jobs were sent overseas to india and china, but in fact 1/3 of those jobs actually went to canada where they have one of the most aggressive tax credits in the world. so i think our brothers up north have maybe something that we can learn from here. it's not the only decision made in terms of where to hire, but they have done a very effective job of neutralizing and invest in their local market. >> well, mr. chairman since we are a domestic company, i'll only talk about the u.s. and i'll site two examples in my remarks when i talked about accelerating investment ps and creating jobs. when you look across the health care space, we have a problem with our health care system. that have spent annually on unnecessary medical costs as a result of poor costs and adherence of prescription drugs. we believe we can accelerate the sale of those drugs by bringing products and services that are a sluelings to hose problems and at the same time lower the overall and ip think many of you know we operate the largest number of in-store retail clinics. we have plans to double the number of clinics over t
immediately conclude that those jobs were sent overseas to india or china, but, in fact, one- third of those jobs went to canada, where they have one of the most regressive tax credits in the world, so i think our brothers up north may have something we can learn from here. this is not the only decision we made, but they have done a very effective job in neutralizing some of the differences
a decision regarding tariffs and markets, businesses make decisions, call centers move to india, manufacturing plants move to mexico. there is one simple question. are we going to face the reality of the marketplace today? if you are 55 years old, it is hard to find a job. we are not creating them fast enough. the idea that we are going to do this and ignore the weight we have created the fabric of consensus around trade is astonishing to me. i hope we will recognize that those workers are not making this decision. we are making a policy. as a result of that policy, we know some people will be thrown out of work. we should do something, minuscule, compared to the overall budget and compared to out with the opposite, to help those workers transition into some kind of new jobs. that is what is at stake here. i hope we are going to honor ronald reagan's, george bush's by partisanship that existed on this topic. if it can pass on its own, why make this big issue of passing it as part of this? pass it. thank you, mr. chairman. >> next is senator pat roberts roberts.or >> i am not pos
in vietnam, and a lot of the ways of the fight now, the india- pakistan war which defines what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career and of his life, 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically, and to him, the cold war, the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia, and his thesis was communism is dead in warsaw, but democracy has not yet won, and for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about whether gorbachev or yeltsin was speaking on that topic. he got a call from president clinton, they had a conservation -- conversation about clinton's russia policy, and you could see how his policy changed along with the advice that was given by richard nixon. as i see it, that is the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's look cheap. he talks about the last sign he saw president nixon, at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. president nixon stood and delivered a speech, capturing the global seen as o
india might loose a lot of its educated population to, say, europe or america to pursue higher educati education. we'll finish off those 12 indicators pick any one and talk to us about why it leads to a failed state. guest: i think one of the most important ones we are seeing is the legitimacy of their state. what we are seeing is that their grorment, their state is the issue. issues such as corruption can hit severely against the indicator. with those in mind, we'll look at the top ten failed states of 2010. somalia, chad, sudan, congo, haiti. zimbabwe, afghanistan, central african republic and iraq. guest: 2z no accident some of those countries have ended up at the worst end of the index. if you look at somalia, it is a country experiencing next, what does that mean for the wider world. we see there is enormous refugee flows. we've seen in the last couple of decades where there have been significant concerns here in washington about the ability of terrorists to operate due to the lack of governing. that is really why we should care that these states are there and should really take n
for business and goes around the world as i have done to china and india and africa, and because there are suggestions you should cancel a trip like that, i think it is talking britain and down, and i think you should be better than that. in 2003, a committee warned about the media. the investigation the prime minister has announced, will we go that far back and related to understand what the committee region really understand what the committee ignored. >> one thing they are looking at is the relationship between the media and politics. >> if they had known newt information, and would he have gone ahead with the appointment? >> i explain this last week. if i have been told the proper information andy coulson knew about hacking, i would have fired him. >> could i congratulate the prime minister on taking the lead when new evidence came out to establishing an independence inquiry. having gotten that independence, can he say he will affirm with the economic tsunami democrats one thing we can do is lead the inquiry to answer difficult questions, and we focus on issues around jobs. >
and they are going to do it at a lower cost. we have to compete with india, china, japan and indonesia and viet na -- vietnam. if we don't, other businesses will compete abroad. a lot of those jobs that those positions were held by african americans. we need to retool the american work force and let me tell you why there are numbers that are disproportionate with african americans. i don't want people doing what they did in the last 400 years. they say because they don't want to work and we have heard that unfortunately over the years. the only reason we know what the numbers are are because those are the individuals who are out seeking work and that's how we know that the unemployment numbers are what theyr but keep in mind, nobody probably thinks about this, every time you read about a state laying off workers , a municipality laying off firefighters or police officers or if you find any government agency laying off, it means that the number of african americans who are unemployed will rise and the reason for that is african americans disproportionately seek work in the government. we have done
: china. india, japan. that's where we should be looking. host: next caller is bernie from new jersey. good morning. caller: good morning. your two guests are excellent. gives me a good perspective on everything. what scares me is there are no plans and no goals. the no goal part scares me as someone that has grown up with this space program at age 59. i think it is bad planning by this administration. i understand the professor saying we have to set our goals to what we are doing next. if we look at the government like your heart. we have arteries going out and veins coming in. if you are out sourcing, you are getting new technology in all the time. there's a lot that has made our life better through the space program. not just the goal of going to mars or whatever. thank you. very interesting discussion you are having. host: thank you. here is a question on facebook from paul. since the columbia accident, nasa has always had a second shuttle on the pad to perform a second rescue if needed, is it not in place for this launch? guest: it is not in place. this launch was intended to be
. in the a 5%. the united states to%. -- india 5%. we need a national infrastructure bank. could have broad bipartisan support. it could help close the gap we need to restore roads, bridges, water systems, energy, telecommunications. allow us to build the 21st century and the structure. create jobs. jobs cannot be outsourced. help develop technology for the future. it is on the cutting edge of the technology once again. good jobs, well paying jobs, jobs one more time. we are a nation that consumes today. let us introduce legislation. american families are struggling today. we do not have the luxury for political games. that will create the jobs and rebuild america. >> thank you very much. the progressive caucus has been up until now on a five city tour. we have invited the local communities to come and talk to us about jobs and about what they see the american dream being. these are heart wrenching, very serious, anguished discussions. they involve the unemployed, the underemployed, and people looking for work who cannot find it. i would suggest to my republican colleagues that they need to
business. our capital can go anywhere in the world, india, china, vietnam, canada, mexico. it can go anywhere. and when you start raising taxes on our job creators and you scratch your head and wonder why they are leaving, it is pretty obvious. we see it in a smammer level in our states where we see more regulation and more taxes in our states like california. all of a sudden, businesses pack up and go to another state that has better rules and regulations and taxes. that happens on a broader scale right here in america. you raise the cost of business, you kill jobs in america. in the end, does it hurt these businesses? no. the people that are hurt are our constituents, our families, our people in our districts that are yes or noing for opportunities, yes or no -- yearning for a job. >> war will it take -- mr. griffin: what will it take tore folks to wobbeder why businesses are leaving the country. they want to point the finger to someone else, some third party, some external cause. maybe we should think about the fact that the policies adopted by the federal government have an impac
, the president that i knew as i came in india, i'm 75, and he created the most debt in the world anybody can hear. then they brought the champion, bush. bush -- the whole war. we were left with the largest debt. i'm a republican. i agree to elect mr. obama. he got the champions. and it's ok to spend the money for -- host: in the meantime, sir -- caller: they have created nothing but messes. host: in the meantime, have you made an attempt to get in touch with your congressman or senator to let them know? caller: yes, i did contact them for the last 70 years and they just gave me lip service and they hardly understand what i am talking about. host: chris in danville, virginia. on our line for democrats. go ahead. caller: i've been watching the coverage and yeah, i've been shooting e-mails back and forth to my representatives and honestly, the only thing that i've been able to figure out so far, the other side's not willing to compromise. they're not willing to talk. they're being to be and act like children. and as a democrat and trusting my country and my government and knowing that this entire co
you are in africa, china, india or others. the biggest picture here is a combination of dealing with the substance and -- with the substantive challenges that europe, the u.s. and japan face, but also what role will we play in shaping the international system. if we have some incredible opportunities. we do not have to look at gloom and doom in this. there are lots of opportunities in africa. china has grown. it depends on how you look at the world, the pair are great opportunities, but they have to be seized and we -- but there are great opportunities, and i have to be seized. >> world bank president robert selleck earlier today. we are waiting to take you live in just a moment back to just outside the senate chamber. we're hoping to hear from senators following the caucus this morning with senator harry reid and others. it looks like there will be taking up the deficit and debt reduction plan. it looks like they're dealing with morning business through 3:00 this afternoon. meanwhile, and the house side, the house rules committee will meet to take up the revised boehner package
, india, and brazil. for a long time, we were told that the best way to win that competition was to undermine consumer protection, undermine clean air and clean water laws, hand out tax breaks to millionaires and billionaires. that was the idea that helped for close to a decade. -- held sway or close to a decade. it did not work out very well. if you look at our history, it has never worked out real well. -- very well. america was built on the hard work and ingenuity of our people and our businesses. we also set up a free system of public schools. a generation was sent to college on the gi bill. we constructed roads and highways that span a continent and through investments in research and technology, we send a man to the moon. we launched the information age and created the internet. we created millions of jobs along the way. that is how you build a strong nation. that is how you build a strong middle class, by making the investments that are needed and always looking out over the horizon. we believe in business. we believe in free markets. we also believe in making sure eve
state in india. you're trying to interrupt the normal, very oppressive functioning of the information's circulation and so on. the way that we should answer this is simply by another analyst paraphrase of that wonderful line from "beggar's opera." founding a new bank. what is your terrorism to the terrorism that we accept day-by- day keeping things the way that they are? when we talk about violent terrorism, we always think about acts which interrupt the normal run of things. but what about violence which has to be here in order for things to function the way that they are? and i'm very skeptical about this, but we should use the term terrorism, it is strictly a reaction to a much stronger terrorism which is here. instead of engaging in the smallest gain, though, no, he is a good diet, like stalin set about when and, if you play with caps. -- said about lenin, you play with cats, no, you are in the sense of terrorists. but who are they that accuse you of terrorism? [applause] it is a nasty job. they tried to give us that the news, all the news that you're giving, [unintelligible] let
industry workers. they extended to non fda countries like china and india. these reforms expired in february. they must extend it in tandem. american workers must have these concerns for the program that meets their needs. it will be available. this is why i were to the chairman in the white house. the revisions are agreed upon in the bill. there clearlyessary to ate it. there is a president directly. the law implementing in it also concluded provisions. it is the largest trading gamut -- trade agreement of the law. i have included this with the fda bill. it is not for close bills. i remain open to these options. it'll be enacted in tandem. let's demonstrate leadership and encourage the opportunity to change things, to save jobs, and approve these trade agreements. >> today we are meeting to discuss legislation for our pending agreements. >> thank you. >> let me say this. these are free trade agreements. it is critical to helping our economy recover and generate the jobs to some have. i have appreciated working with chairman baucus on this process. we did not always agreed. this
produced in india. all the illustrations were electronically created in thailand. and all the books were printed overseas. and the client that in these books were for work four american taxpayers children who go to school every day -- kindergarten through the sixth grade -- for american taxpayers's children go to school. the congress and the senate and they get up there and are so pompous about everything. they outsource all of these american jobs. it is disgraceful what they have done to this country. host: trade agreements are on the table this week in discussion on capitol hill with the house smoke ways and means committee taking a look at three agreements for south korea, colombia, and panama. this is "the wall street journal" this morning with a piece about a program attached to the free trade agreement -- trade assistance administration program. it says -- the story continues inside "the wall street journal." elizabeth williamson reports about how much this costs. we will go to mary who has a job in houston, texas. your thoughts. caller: first of all, where does the president think
september 11 and the global war on terrorism. our sympathy to the people of india who yet suffered another terrorist attack on the people of mumbai. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina rise? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. butterfield: madam speaker, i rise today to pay tribute to bishop f.c. barnes, a great friend and distinguished american who has passed away at the age of 82. 52 years ago bishop barnes founded holy church and continued as senior pastor until his death. the church congregation grew from a few members to a few hundred. he was a world renowned vocalist, known for his extraordinary musical talent. he recorded many productions including the award-winning "rough side of the mountain." the loss is irreplaceable. his enormous contribution to his church, the county and indeed the nation are deeply appreciated and recognized on this day. bishop barnes leaves a strong and loving family, including his church family who w
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